Backgrounders on the Bible through Biblical Archaeology

Archaeological Interviews

1560-1561 Randall Price – Qumran Cave #12

qumrancave4

Qumran Cave #4

For more than 60 years, the story of the Dead Sea Scrolls discovery has included mention of the 11 caves in which scrolls and scroll materials were found. Then, earlier this year, it was announced that Cave #12 has been identified. A new effort to identify caves with archaeological contents along the shore of the Dead Sea has begun.

On this program we talk with professor Randall Price, one of the leaders of this year’s Cave #12 excavation for more details on the cave search and what’s ahead.


1558-1559 John DeLancey – Qumran Cave #12 & 2017 Excavation Plans

John DeLancey

John DeLancey

The 11 caves in which Dead Sea Scroll materials were found more than a half century ago have been joined by one more cave, cave #12. No new scrolls were found, but archaeologists did unearth evidence of scroll storage jars and related materials left behind by looters who plundered the site decades ago. We discuss this find and several other sites where archaeology is going on this year with John DeLancey, who will be the co-leader of our May 2018 TB&TS Israel Study tour.

In the second program we continue to review some of the most interesting sites in Israel where excavations are planned for 2017. This is an annual feature which gives listeners an idea of where Biblical Archaeology is focused right now, and it also serves to remind listeners that these are all opportunities where volunteers can get involved and do some hands-on biblical research. As William Dever once said, on The Book & The Spade program, “The only new facts about the Bible and the biblical world are coming from the ground.”


1555-1557 Craig Evans – Jesus & the Remains of His Day

Icon of Jesus from the church at Tabgha, along the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee.

Icon of Jesus from the church at Tabgha, along the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee.

Biblical Archaeology covers thousands of years of Old Testament history. It also includes three years of the public ministry of Jesus of Nazareth. Professor Craig Evans of Houston Baptist University has a new book, Jesus and the Remains of His Day, that focuses on some of the most important archaeological discoveries that tell us about Jesus, his ministry, and the world he lived in.

Jesus’ ministry was centered around the Sea of Galilee and today cities along the seashore are being excavated, including Magdala, the home of Mary Magdalene. But there’s a lot more, and we discuss these discoveries in these three programs.

UPDATE: This week’s Biblical Archaeology news is about the 12th cave discovery near Qumran. Up to now there’s only been 11 caves in which Dead Sea Scroll materials were found. Archaeologists have now identified one more. This week’s guest, Craig Evans, has an article on the Logos Academic blog, and also an article on the Fox News Opinion website. There’s always something new happening in Biblical Archaeology.


1554 Brent Seales – The Library at Herculaneum

prof. Brent Seales

prof. Brent Seales

We check in again with Brent Seales, chair of the computer science department at the University of Kentucky, for an update on his efforts to read ancient scrolls which are unreadable without a X-ray scan and his software to virtually unroll the scrolls. Professor Seales first got our attention a year and a half ago with the news that he had virtually unrolled a carbonized scroll of Leviticus, excavated in 1970 from a burned synagogue on the Dead Sea shore at Engedi.

At the time he took up the Leviticus scroll professor Seales had been at somewhat of a dead end on his efforts to read scrolls from the Villa of the Papyri, excavated a century and a half ago from Herculaneum. The ink on the scrolls was indistinguishable from the burned black papyri. But now professor Seales believes he’s found the solution to that problem, and it may well be that this ancient library, destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, is once again going to be available to interested readers.


1296-1298 again, with Thomas Oden

3933Five years ago we interviewed theologian Thomas Oden about his new InterVarsity Press book, The African Memory of Mark. It was an intriguing new perspective on the author of the shortest Gospel.

Thomas Oden died December 8, 2016. He was 85. We are rebroadcasting these programs in his memory.

Oden has an interesting story about his theological journey, as reported in Christianity Today and other publications. Terry Mattingly also had a column on Thomas Oden.

 


1549-1550 Frankie Snyder – Tiles of the Temple

Frankie Snyder

Frankie Snyder

A mathematician has come up with designs of the floors of the first century temple, the temple of Jesus’ time, built by King Herod. These geometric stone tile floors are called Opus Sectile, a design brought to Israel by Herod and used in many of his projects.

In these two programs Frankie Snyder describes her detective work and what has been discovered about this unique flooring design.


1548 Darrell Bock – The Tomb of Jesus

Darrell Bock - Dallas Theological Seminary

Darrell Bock – Dallas Theological Seminary

Archaeologists and conservators in Jerusalem are repairing the edicule, a small structure that covers the traditional location of the tomb of Jesus in the rotunda of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. During a 60-hour period they were able to remove the marble covering of the stone tomb and observe for the first time in four and a half centuries the actual stone bench on which the body of Jesus is believed to have lain.

But could this actually be the Tomb of Jesus? There are questions about which site is right so we went to Darrell Bock, Research Professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary to seek some answers.