Backgrounders on the Bible through Biblical Archaeology

Posts tagged “Technology

1554 Brent Seales – The Library at Herculaneum

prof. Brent Seales

prof. Brent Seales

We check in again with Brent Seales, chair of the computer science department at the University of Kentucky, for an update on his efforts to read ancient scrolls which are unreadable without a X-ray scan and his software to virtually unroll the scrolls. Professor Seales first got our attention a year and a half ago with the news that he had virtually unrolled a carbonized scroll of Leviticus, excavated in 1970 from a burned synagogue on the Dead Sea shore at Engedi.

At the time he took up the Leviticus scroll professor Seales had been at somewhat of a dead end on his efforts to read scrolls from the Villa of the Papyri, excavated a century and a half ago from Herculaneum. The ink on the scrolls was indistinguishable from the burned black papyri. But now professor Seales believes he’s found the solution to that problem, and it may well be that this ancient library, destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, is once again going to be available to interested readers.


1545 Brent Seales – Reading Carbonized Texts 2016

prof. Brent Seales

prof. Brent Seales

One year later, we bring our listeners up to date on the latest from University of Kentucky Computer Science professor Brent Seales and his computer program for virtually opening unopenable ancient texts.

Further work has been done on the carbonized scroll from Engedi that we discussed a year ago, revealing its total contents are the first two chapters of the Old Testament book of Leviticus. New dating, based on the form of the letters in the text, reveals that this book is as old as the Dead Sea Scrolls.


#1244 – New Technology Report

Yuval Goren

Yuval Goren demonstrating the new technology.

In this week’s report we take a look at the impact of technology on Biblical Archaeology: a couple examples of new technology applied to ancient documents, and some older technology applied to a particular excavation site.

One example of the new technology analyzes ancient documents. Yuval Goren of Tel Aviv University used off-the-shelf medical diagnostic equipment to develop this new tool.